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Filipino Pochero Recipe using pork belly

Try this Filipino Pork Pochero recipe using pork belly. A tomato-based stew that has ripe plantain bananas that set it apart from any other! | wordpress-152313-459899.cloudwaysapps.comPochero (Puchero) is another great dish that we inherited from the Spanish. It is a stew of meat, vegetable, root crops and legumes and was originally considered as peasant stew (in Andalusia). This is because the meat that was usually used were from cheapest (fatty) cuts from a pig, cow, and chicken and with vegetables that were in season.

Try this Filipino Pork Pochero recipe using pork belly. A tomato-based stew that has ripe plantain bananas that set it apart from any other! | wordpress-152313-459899.cloudwaysapps.comThe Filipino Pochero is slightly different as it has tomato sauce and it. What sets it apart from other tomato-based stew is that it (must) have ripe plantain banana or ‘saba’. This makes a rather interesting flavor to the stew because it adds a natural sweetness to the dish.

I chose to pre-boil the pork belly to make sure that they are really tender and the vegetables not overcooked. I did it the night before and then placed the meat and broth in the fridge until it was time to cook my Pochero the next day.  It is also a good idea especially for those who do not have enough time to prepare it for lunch or dinner.

Try this Filipino Pork Pochero recipe using pork belly. A tomato-based stew that has ripe plantain bananas that set it apart from any other! | wordpress-152313-459899.cloudwaysapps.comBy the way, this post is for Tina who requested this recipe of Pochero and who loves impressing her son and husband with her great Filipino food! 🙂

5.0 from 1 reviews
Pork Pochero Recipe
Author: 
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 800 grams pork belly cut into cubes
  • 2-3 Tablespoon oil
  • 2 ripe plantain bananas, each cut into 3 pieces
  • 1 small carrots, cut into chunks
  • 1 big or 2 medium potatoes, cut into quarters
  • 2 gloves garlic, minced
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 medium tomatoes, cut into chunks
  • 1 Tablespoon tomato paste
  • 2 Tablespoon fish sauce
  • ⅛ teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1 cup chickpeas (garbanzos), canned
  • 2-3 cups (pork) broth or water
  • 1 bunch Pak choi, the base cut
Instructions
  1. Boil pork belly in water until it becomes tender. Separate the meat and broth when ready to cook.
  2. Heat oil in a deep pan or a pot and fry the potatoes, carrots, and bananas until the edges are slightly browned. Remove from oil and transfer to a plate.
  3. In the same oil saute garlic, onion, and tomato until limp.
  4. Add the pork belly cuts and the tomato paste. Season with fish sauce and ground pepper.
  5. Next, add back the fried potatoes, carrots and banana plantain (saba) and also the chickpeas.
  6. Pour in the broth/water and let it simmer to cook the potatoes and carrots and until the broth turns into a thicker sauce.
  7. Lastly, add the pak choi and turn off the heat. Cover the pot for 3 minutes to cook the pak choi.
  8. Serve hot with rice.
Notes
If the plantain bananas are not sweet enough, add a teaspoon of sugar.

Try this Filipino Pork Pochero recipe using pork belly. A tomato-based stew that has ripe plantain bananas that set it apart from any other! | wordpress-152313-459899.cloudwaysapps.com

Bebs

Bebs here! I love to cook and try new things and DIY projects! And although I think of myself as a homebody, I like seeing other places from time to time.
If you are looking for a recipe and it ain't here, make a request and I will try my best to make it for you!

This Post Has 4 Comments
  1. Wow.. Your thoughts and cooking ways are exact of myself. You know your history and your facts are right on. You also know how to cook these dish the correct way. I amazed by your knowledge of why certain meat cuts were used etc. Most notable where these dishes are inherited from. Thanks for being real.. sincerely Al

    1. Thanks for the nice comment Albert. I try to do some research for every recipe especially if it is the first time I make them and some you know from experience and by instinct 😉

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